HEALTH – DEGENERATIVE DISEASES – MS


3 ARTICLES


RESISTANCE TRAINING MAY SLOW DOWN THE PROGRESSION OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS – 2017


New research shows that resistance training protects the brain in persons with multiple sclerosis, which may delay the development of the disease
August 1, 2017; Aarhus University
SUMMARY:
– In the past, multiple sclerosis patients were advised not to exercise for fear of exacerbating the illness
– However, it is now known that physical training can relieve many of the symptoms, including the excessive fatigue and mobility impairments that are often seen
– New research now shows that resistance training may protect the nervous system and thus slow the progression of the disease.


TIME COURSE OF STRENGTH ADAPTATIONS FOLLOWING HIGH INTENSITY RESISTANCE TRAINING IN INDIVIDUALS WITH MS – 2017


Manca, A., Dvir, Z., Dragone, D. et al. 2017
INTRODUCTION
– No evidence exists regarding the time course and clinical relevance of muscle strength improvements following resistance training in people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS)
– We investigated the temporal course and clinical meaningfulness of the changes in strength induced by high-intensity resistance training and whether these changes impact on muscle endurance to fatigue and functional outcomes.
METHODS
– PwMS with predominantly unilateral hyposthenia of the ankle dorsiflexors underwent a 6-week isokinetic training of the more affected ankle dorsiflexion muscles
– Maximal strength was measured at baseline, during the training on a weekly basis, at the end of the intervention (POST) and at the 12-week follow-up
– Muscle endurance to fatigue, mobility and walking outcomes were assessed at baseline, POST and follow-up
– Reproducibility and responsiveness analyses were performed
RESULTS
1. Significant gains in muscle strength were detected after 3 wks of training with no further improvements in the following wks
2. These improvements exceeded the cutoff values for relevant changes and were also positively correlated to improved muscle endurance to fatigue and mobility measures
3. None of the observed changes in muscle performance and functional outcomes was retained at the follow-up
CONCLUSIONS
– Preliminary evidence showed that 3 weeks of high-intensity resistance training induces consistent and meaningful improvements in muscle performance of the ankle dorsiflexors in PwMS


SPORT CAN HELP MS PATIENTS – 2014


September 30, 2014; Asociación RUVID
SUMMARY:
– People with multiple sclerosis may reduce perceived fatigue and increase mobility through a series of combined strength training and fitness exercises, a study has concluded.


Comments are closed.