STRENGTH | MUSCLE – UB – PULLS


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PULL EXERCISES


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ROWS


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TRAPS



Effects of Grip Width on Muscle Strength and Activation in the Lat Pull Down


Andersen, Vidar1; Fimland, Marius S.2,3; Wiik, Espen1; Skoglund, Anders1; Saeterbakken, Atle H.1
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research:
April 2014 – Volume 28 – Issue 4 – p 1135–1142
INTRODUCTION: It is a general belief that a wider grip activates the latissimus dorsi more than a narrow one
AIM: compare 6RM load and electromyographic (EMG) activity in the lat pull-down using 3 different pronated grip widths
METHODS: 15 men performed 6RM with narrow, medium, and wide grips (1, 1.5, 2x biacromial distance)
RESULTS:
(1) The 6RM strengths with narrow (80.3 ± 7.2 kg) and medium grip (80 ± 7.1 kg) were higher than wide grip (77.3 ± 6.3 kg)
(2) There was similar EMG activation between grip widths for latissimus, trapezius, or infraspinatus, but a tendency for biceps brachii activation to be greater for medium vs. narrow, when the entire movement was analyzed
(3) Analyzing the concentric phase separately revealed greater biceps brachii activation using the medium vs. narrow grip
(4) In the eccentric phase, there was greater activation using wide vs. narrow grip for latissimus and infraspinatus and tendencies for medium greater than narrow for latissimus, and medium greater than wide for biceps, was observed
CONCLUSION: Collectively, a medium grip may have some minor advantages over small and wide grips; however, athletes and others engaged in resistance training can generally expect similar muscle activation which in turn should result in similar hypertrophy gains with a grip width that is 1–2 times the biacromial distance


The Effect of Performing Bi and Unilateral Row Exercises on Core Muscle Activation


International Journal of Sports Medicine 36(11) · July 2015
Atle Hole Saeterbakken; Vidar Andersen
PURPOSE/METHOD
– Compare core muscle activation in 3 different row exercises (free-weight bent-over row, seated cable row and machine row) performed unilaterally and bilaterally, at matched effort levels
– 15 resistance-trained men (26.0±4.4 years, 81.0±9.5 kg, 1.81±0.07 m) performed the exercises in randomized order.
RESULTS
– Erector spinae, EMG in bilateral free-weight row was greater than bilateral machine 34% and unilateral free-weight rows 12%
– Erector spinae and Multifidus, EMG in unilateral machine- and cable row were 60-63% and 74-78% of the bilateral performance
– External oblique, EMG during bilateral exercises were 37-41% of the unilateral performance
– External oblique and Multifidus, EMG in unilateral cable- and machine rows were 50-57% and 70-73% of the free-weight row
– Rectus abdominis there were no significant differences between conditions
CONCLUSIONS
1) free-weight row provided greater EMG activity in erector spinae (bilaterally and unilaterally) and multifidus (unilaterally) than machine row
2) unilateral performance of exercises activated the external oblique more than bilateral performance, regardless of exercise
3) generally bilateral performance of exercises provided higher erector spinae and multifidus EMG activity compared to unilateral performance


 

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