NUTRITION – PROTEIN – STRENGTH TRAINING – AGING


7 ARTICLES + 1 GRAPHIC – CLICK ON GRAPHIC TO ENLARGE



POST-MEAL PROTEIN FOLLOWING RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN OLDER MALES – 2017


Andrew M. HolwerdLuc J. C. van Loon et al
METHODS
– 48 healthy older men 66±1 yrs
– 0, 15, 30 or 45 g milk protein after performing a single bout of resistance type exercise
RESULTS
1. Whole body protein breakdown rates were lower after ingestion of 45 g when compared with 0 g
2. Whole-body protein oxidation rates were increased after ingestion of 45 g when compared with 15 g and 0 g protein


WHAT IS THE OPTIMAL AMOUNT OF PROTEIN POST-EXERCISE IN THE OLDER ADULT – 2016


Tyler A. Churchward-Venne, Andrew M. Holwerda, Stuart M. Phillips, Luc J. C. van Loon
YOUNGER ADULTS
– Muscle protein synthesis rates are maximally stimulated following ingestion of ~20 g of protein
OLDER ADULTS
– Older adults are less sensitive to smaller doses of ingested protein (less than ~20 g) after exercise
– However, older muscle appears to retain the capacity to display a robust stimulation of muscle protein synthesis in response to greater doses of protein (~40 g)
– This amount may be required to achieve a robust stimulation of muscle protein synthesis during post-exercise recovery

EX: If you weigh 176lbs or 80kg your calculation would be 80 x .5 = 40 grams


PER MEAL DOSE AND FREQUENCY OF PROTEIN IS ASSOCIATED WITH LEAN MASS AND MUSCLE PERFORMANCE – 2016


Loenneke JP1Loprinzi PD2Murphy CH3Phillips SM3.
AIM:
– Examine whether the number of times an individual consumed a minimum of 30g of PRO at a meal is associated with leg lean mass and knee extensor strength
METHODS:
– Data from the 1999-2002 NHANES were used, with 1081 adults (50-85 y)
CONCLUSIONS:
– More frequent meals containing 30 to 45 g protein produced the greatest association with leg lean mass and strength


PROTEIN IS PROTECTIVE AGAINST LOSS OF GRIP STRENGTH IN OLDER ADULTS – 2015


McLean RR1Mangano KM1Hannan MT1Kiel DP1Sahni S2.
METHODS:
(1) Determine the association of dietary protein (total, animal, and plant) intake with change in grip strength over 6 years in 1,746 men and women
(2) Mean age at baseline was 58.7 years (range: 29-85), and mean total, animal, and plant protein intakes were 79, 57, and 22g/d, respectively
RESULTS:
(1) Adjusted baseline mean grip strength did not differ across quartiles of energy-adjusted total, animal or protein intake
(2) Greater protein intake, regardless of source, was associated with less decrease in grip strength
(3) Participants >60 yrs (n = 646) had similar linear trends on loss of grip strength for total and animal but not plant protein
(4) Trends in participants <60 yrs (n = 896) were not statistically significant
CONCLUSIONS:
– Higher intakes of total and animal protein were protective against loss of grip strength in community-dwelling adults aged 60 yrs +


MORE PROTEIN FOR MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN OLDER VS. YOUNGER MEN – 2014


Moore DR1, Churchward-Venne TA2, Witard O3, Breen L4, Burd NA5, Tipton KD3, Phillips SM
METHODS:
– We retrospectively analyzed data from our laboratories that measured:
(1) MPS in healthy older (~71 yrs) and younger (~22 yrs) men after 0-40 g protein
(2) Protein was taken in a single dose and normalized to body mass and, where available, lean body mass (LBM)
RESULTS:
(1) There was no difference in basal MPS rates between older and young men
(2) MPS reached a plateau relative to body mass in older men of 0.40 g/kg and younger men of 0.24 g/kg
(3) MPS reached a plateau relative to lean body mass in older men of 0.60 g/kg and younger men of 0.25 g/kg
CONCLUSIONS:
– This is the first report of the relative (to body weight) protein ingested dose response of MPS in younger and older men
– Healthy older men are less sensitive to low PRO intakes
– They require a greater relative PRO intake, in a single meal, than young men to maximally stimulate post-meal rates of MPS

EX: If you weigh 176lbs or 80kg your calculation would be 80 x .5 = 40 grams


DOSE DEPENDENT INCREASES IN BCAAs IN OLDER MEN FOLLOWING RE & PROTEIN INTAKE – 2014


Randall F. D’Souza1, David Cameron-Smith, et al
METHOD:
– 46 men 60–75 yrs (~86kg, ~176cm) did a single bout of unaccustomed lower body resistance exercise immediately followed by:
(1) a noncaloric placebo beverage
(2) or supplement containing 10, 20, 30, or 40 g whey protein concentrate (WPC)
RESULTS:
(1) Resistance exercise alone reduced intramuscular branch chain amino acid (BCAA; leucine, isoleucine, and valine) content
(2) Supplementation with increasing doses of whey protein prevented this fall in muscle BCAAs during postexercise recovery
(3) Larger doses (30 g and 40 g) significantly augmented postexercise muscle BCAA content
CONCLUSIONS:
– Intramuscular BCAAs, and leucine in particular, appear to be important regulators of anabolic signaling in aged human muscle during postexercise recovery

EX: If you weigh 176lbs or 80kg your calculation would be 80 x .5 = 40 grams


PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND BEEF INTAKE ENHANCED WITH RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN MIDDLE-AGED MEN – 2013


Meghann J Robinson, Burd, Leigh Breen, Rerecich, Yifan Yang, Hector, SBaker, Stuart M Phillips
METHOD:
– 35 middle-aged men (59 ± 2 yrs; 82.6 ± 12.7 kg; 1.75 ± 0.1 m) (n = 7 per group) ingested (15% fat) ground beef:
(1) 0g
(2) 57 g or 2 oz; 12 g protein
(3) 113 g or 4 oz; 24 g protein
(4) 170 g or 6 oz; 36 g protein
– Subjects performed a bout of unilateral resistance exercise to allow measurement of fed state and fed plus resistance exercise state
RESULTS
(1) MPS was increased with ingestion of 170 g of beef to a greater extent than all other doses at rest and after resistance exercise
(2) There was more leucine oxidation with ingestion of 113 g of beef than with 0 g and 57 g, and it increased further after ingestion of 170 g of beef
CONCLUSION:
– Ingestion of 170 g of beef protein is required to stimulate a rise in myofibrillar MPS over and above that seen with lower doses

EX: If you weigh 176lbs or 80kg your calculation would be 80 x .5 = 40 grams


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