NUTRITION – PROTEIN – POST WORKOUT


5 RESEARCH ARTICLES + 23 GRAPHICS – CLICK ON GRAPHIC TO ENLARGE



TIMING




RECOVERY



WHAT KIND OF PROTEIN?




5 RESEARCH ARTICLES


ACHIEVING OPTIMAL POST-EXERCISE MUSCLE PROTEIN REMODELING IN PHYSICALLY ACTIVE ADULTS THROUGH WHOLE FOOD CONSUMPTION – 2018


Stephan van Vliet, Nicholas A. Burd et al
– The performance of acute exercise enhances muscle protein remodeling by stimulating protein synthesis rates for several hours after each bout, which can be optimized by consuming protein during the post-exercise 
recovery period
– To date, the majority of the evidence regarding protein intake to optimize post-exercise muscle protein synthesis rates is limited to isolated protein sources
– However, it is more common to ingest whole food sources of protein within a normal eating pattern.
– Emerging evidence demonstrates a promising role for the ingestion of whole foods as an effective nutritional strategy to support muscle protein remodeling and recovery after exercise


THE RESPONSE OF MPS FOLLOWING WHOLE-BODY RESISTANCE EXERCISE IS GREATER FOLLOWING 40 grams than 20 grams of WHEY PROTEIN – 2016



Lindsay S. Macnaughton, 1 Sophie L. Wardle, 1 Oliver C. Witard, 1 Chris McGlory, 2 D. Lee Hamilton, 1 Stewart Jeromson, 1 Clare E. Lawrence, 3 Gareth A. Wallis, 4 and Kevin D. Tipton
AIM

– Assess LEAN BODY MASS (LBM), both total and amount activated during exercise, on maximal response of MPS to 20 or 40 g whey protein following whole‐body resistance exercise
DESIGN
– Resistance‐trained males were assigned to a group:
(1) lower LBM (51 to 64 kg; 112 lbs to 141 lbs; LLBM n = 15)
(2) higher LBM (71 to 84 kg; 156 lbs to 185 lbs; HLBM n = 15)
CONCLUSIONS
1. Ingestion of 40 g whey protein following whole‐body resistance exercise stimulates a greater MPS response than 20 g in young resistance‐trained men
2. However, with the current doses, the total amount of LBM does not seem to influence the response

LLBM (≤65 kg lean body mass) HLBM (≥70 kg lean mass)
Age (y) 21.3 ± 2.2 23.2 ± 3.5
Body mass (kg) 76.8 ± 4.8 98.0 ± 7.8*
Height (m) 1.78 ± 0.05 1.84 ± 0.05*
Lean body mass (kg) 59.3 ± 3.9

(Range = 51.0‐64.4)

76.9 ± 4.3*

(Range = 70.7‐83.9)

Fat mass (kg) 14.0 ± 3.3 17.0 ± 5.8
Lean mass (%) 77.7 ± 3.6 78.4 ± 4.7
Fat mass (%) 18.8 ± 3.7 17.3 ± 4.9

WHEY PROTEIN ACCELERATES SATELLITE CELL GROWTH DURING RECOVERY FROM ECCENTRIC EXERCISE – 2014


Jean Farup; Stine Klejs Rahbek; Inge Skovgaard Knudsen; Frank de Paoli; Abigail L. Mackey; Kristian Vissing
INTRODUCTION
– Muscle satellite cells (SCs) are essential for muscle regeneration and remodeling processes involving muscle breakdown
PURPOSE
– Investigate effect of hydrolyzed whey protein following eccentric exercise on fiber type-specific SC accumulation
DESIGN
– 24 young subjects, during post-exercise recovery from 150 maximal unilateral eccentric contractions, received either:
(1) hydrolyzed whey protein + carbohydrate (whey, n = 12)
(2) iso-caloric carbohydrate (placebo, n = 12).
RESULTS
(1) In type II fiber SCs, the whey group increased SCs/fiber and exhibited a difference from placebo group at 48 h
(2) The whey group increased SCs/myonuclei from 4 % to 10 % at 48 h
(3) the placebo group increased from 5 % to 9 % at 168 h
(4) MVC decreased and muscle soreness and CK increased irrespective of supplementation


CARBOHYDRATE DELAYS DIETARY PROTEIN DIGESTION AND ABSORPTION BUT DOES NOT MODULATE POST MEAL PROTEIN INCREASE – 2014


Stefan H M Gorissen, Nicholas A Burd, Henrike M Hamer, Annemie P Gijsen, Bart B Groen, Luc J C van Loon
DESIGN
– 24 healthy young (age: 21±1) and 25 older (age: 75±1 y) men:
(1) 20 g protein with 60g carbohydrate (Pro+CHO)
(2) 20 g protein without carbohydrate
CONCLUSION
– CHO co-ingestion with PRO delays dietary PRO digestion and absorption, but does not modulate postprandial muscle PRO accretion (increase) in healthy young or older men


MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN RESPONSE TO INCREASING DOSES OF WHEY PROTEIN AT REST AND AFTER RESISTANCE EXERCISE – 2014




Witard OC1Jackman SRBreen LSmith KSelby ATipton KD.
DESIGN

– Volunteers (n = 48)
(1) Consumed 0.54 g/kg body mass breakfast; 176lbs = 80kg x .54=43g Protein
(2) 3 hours later, a bout of unilateral exercise (8 × 10 leg presses and leg extensions; 80% one-repetition maximum) was performed
(3) 0, 10, 20, or 40 g whey protein isolate immediately (~10 min) after exercise
RESULTS
(1) Myofibrillar MPS increased above 0 g whey protein by 49% with the ingestion of 20 g whey protein
(2) Myofibrillar MPS increased above 0 g whey protein by 56% with the ingestion of 40 g whey protein
(3) No additional stimulation was observed with 10 g whey protein
CONCLUSIONS
(1) 20g whey is sufficient for max stimulation of postabsorptive rates of myofibrillar MPS in rested and exercised muscle (~80-kg resistance-trained, young men)
(2) A dose of whey protein >20 g stimulates amino acid oxidation and ureagenesis


 

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