NUTRITION – GETTING LEANER


2 RESEARCH ARTICLES + 8 GRAPHICS – CLICK ON GRAPHICS TO ENLARGE – ADAMEDDIE JOEASKERANTONIOYANN LeMEUR | BEARDSLEY



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CPP HUMAN PERFORMANCE LAB – 2018
– After 1 yr there were no significant differences in total wt loss, body fat %, or RMR suppression b/n the 2 diets
– These findings suggest that caloric deficit via caloric restriction is the main driver of wt loss in overwt individuals
NOTE:
– As we undergo caloric deficit to drive a loss of fat mass, we can only assess (at least practically) the success of a program by changes that are observable
– We grow impatient with lack of observable change and are quick to label the program ineffective or we simply quit
– Persistence and patience is key
– Just because you don’t see observable changes doesn’t mean nothing is happening


Reduced fat mass and increased lean mass in response to 1 year of melatonin treatment in postmenopausal women – 2015


Amstrup AK1Sikjaer T1Pedersen SB1,2Heickendorff L3Mosekilde L1Rejnmark L1,2.
OBJECTIVE

– Apart from regulating the circadian rhythm, melatonin is believed to have a positive effect on body weight and energy metabolism. So far, the evidence for this relies mainly on animal models. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of melatonin on body composition, lipid and glucose metabolism in humans
DESIGN/METHODS
– In a double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we randomized 81 postmenopausal women to 1 year of treatment with melatonin (1 or 3 mg nightly) or placebo. Body composition was measured by DXA. Measures were obtained at baseline and after 1 year of treatment along with leptin, adiponectin and insulin. Markers of glucose homeostasis were measured at the end of the study
RESULTS
– In response to treatment, fat mass decreased in the melatonin group by 6·9% (95% CI: 1·4%; 12·4%, P = 0·02) compared to placebo. A borderline significant increase in lean mass of 5·2% was found in the melatonin group compared to placebo (3·3%, (IQR:-1·7; 6·2) vs -1·9%, (IQR: -5·7; 5·8), P = 0·08). After adjusting for BMI, lean mass increased by 2·6% (95% CI: 0·1; 5·0, P = 0·04) in the melatonin group. Changes in body weight and BMI did not differ between groups. Adiponectin increased borderline significantly by 21% in the melatonin group compared to placebo (P = 0·08). No significant changes were observed for leptin, insulin or markers of glucose homeostasis.
CONCLUSION
– Our results suggest a possibly beneficial effect of melatonin on body composition and lipid metabolism as 1 year of treatment reduces fat mass, increases lean mass and is associated with a trend towards an increase in adiponectin.


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