HEALTH – PAIN – EXERCISE & REDUCING PAIN


5 RESEARCH ARTICLES


REDUCED MODULATION OF PAIN IN OLDER ADULTS AFTER ISOMETRIC AND AEROBIC EXERCISE – 2016


Naugle KM, et al
INTRODUCTION
– Little is known regarding the effect of aging on exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH)
METHODS
– Healthy older and younger adults completed 1 training session and 4 testing sessions
– a submaximal isometric handgrip exercise, vigorous or moderate intensity stationary cycling, or quiet rest (control)
– The following measures were taken before and after exercise/quiet rest:
1) pressure pain thresholds
2) suprathreshold pressure pain ratings
3) pain ratings during 30 seconds of prolonged noxious heat stimulation
4) temporal summation of heat pain.
RESULTS
– Results revealed age differences in EIH after isometric and aerobic exercise, with younger adults experiencing greater EIH compared with older adults
– The age differences in EIH varied across pain induction techniques and exercise type
– This knowledge could help clinicians optimize exercise as a method of pain management


Vaegter HB, et al
BACKGROUND
– Physical inactivity is a risk factor for chronic pain
– Several mechanisms play a role in pain chronification including impairment of pain inhibition
METHODS
– 56 (28 females) subjects participated in this study
– Subjects were subgrouped into active (n = 30) and inactive (n = 26)
– Conditioned pain modulation (CPM) was assessed by cold pressor testing
– Exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) was assessed after 15 minutes bicycling at a heart rate corresponding to 75% VO2max
– Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded at the dominant arm and leg before, immediately after, and 15 min after conditioning and exercise as well as before and after rest
– PPTs were also recorded during conditioning
RESULTS
– At baseline, PPTs in inactive men were increased compared with inactive women
– During cold pressor test and after exercise, PPTs increased to the same degree in active and inactive subjects, and the CPM and EIH responses were correlated
– The CPM response immediately after cold pressor test was maintained in women but not in men
CONCLUSIONS
– Cold pressor stimulation and aerobic exercise caused comparable multisegmental increases in PPT in active and inactive men and women
– The CPM and EIH responses were correlated, but they have different temporal manifestation of hypoalgesia


Vaegter HB, et al.
DESIGN
– Exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH) and Conditioned pain modulation (CPM)
– 80 healthy subjects (40 females), between 18 and 65 years of age
– CPM was assessed by 2 different cold pressor tests (hand and foot)
– EIH was assessed by 2 intensities of aerobic bicycling exercises and 2 intensities of isometric muscle contraction exercises (arm and leg)
– Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were recorded
RESULTS
– PPTs increased at local as well as at remote sites during both cold pressor tests and after all of the exercise conditions except low-intensity bicycling
– EIH after bicycling was higher in women than in men
– CPM and the EIH responses after isometric exercises were comparable in men and women and were not affected by age
– The EIH response was larger in the exercising body part compared with nonexercising body parts for all exercise conditions
– High-intensity exercise produced greater EIH responses than did low-intensity exercise
– The change in PPTs during cold pressor tests and the change in PPTs after exercises were not correlated


Jones MD, et al.
PURPOSE
– To examine the effect of aerobic exercise training on pain sensitivity in healthy individuals
METHODS
– Pressure pain threshold, ischemic pain tolerance and pain ratings during ischemia were assessed in 24 participants before and after:
GROUP 1: 6 wk of structured aerobic exercise training (n = 12)
GROUP 2: or after 6 wk of usual physical activity (n = 12
– The exercise training regimen consisted of cycling 3x/wk for 30 min at 75% of maximal oxygen consumption reserve
RESULTS
– Moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise training increases ischemic pain tolerance in healthy individuals

EXERCISE INDUCED HYPOALGESIA: INTERVAL VS. CONTINUOUS MODE – 2014


Kodesh E, Weissman-Fogel
INTRODUCTION
Aerobic exercise at approx 70% of maximal aerobic capacity moderately reduces pain sensitivity and reduces pain, even after a single session
If the analgesic effects depend on exercise intensity, then high-intensity interval exercise at 85% of maximal aerobic capacity should further reduce pain
METHODS
– 29 young untrained healthy males
Group 1: aerobic-continuous – 70% heart rate reserve (HRR); 3o min.
Group 2: interval – 4 × 4 min at 85% HRR and 2 min at 60% HRR between cycles; 30 min.
RESULTS
– HPT Heat Pain Thresholds increased and Tonic Heat Pain decreased following exercise unrelated to exercise type
– However, the main time effect (pre-/postexercise) was a trend of increased HPT and a significant reduction in following interval exercise
– No significant change was found for the pressure pain threshold following either exercise type


 

Comments are closed.