HEALTH – METABOLIC SYNDROME – STRENGTH & MUSCLE


3 ARTICLES


CUT POINTS OF MUSCLE STRENGTH ASSOCIATED WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME IN MEN – 2014


Sénéchal M1, et al
OBJECTIVE
– Loss of muscle strength with age increases the likelihood of metabolic syndrome (MetS)
METHOD
5685 men age <50 yr and 1541 men age ≥50 yr enrolled in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study
– Upper and lower body strength was treated as a composite measure of 1RM tests on bench and leg press and scaled to body weight
– Low muscle strength was defined as the lowest age-specific 20th percentile
– High muscle strength was defined as composite muscle strength above the 20th percentile
RESULTS
(1) In men aged <50 yr, the odds of MetS were 2.20x higher in those with low muscle strength, independent of age, smoking, and alcohol intakE
(2) The strength of this association was similar for men age ≥50 yr
(3) In men age <50 yr, composite strength threshold associated with MetS was 2.57 kg·kg body wt
(4) In men age ≥ 50 yr threshold was 2.35 kg·kg body wt
CONCLUSION
Measures of muscle strength may help identify men at risk of chronic disease


SKELETAL MUSCLE LIPID CONTENT AND OXIDATIVE ACTIVITY IN RELATION TO MUSCLE FIBER TYPE IN AGING AND METABOLIC SYNDROME – 2014


Gueugneau M1, et al
INTRODUCTION
– One of the most noticeable effects of aging is the reduction in skeletal muscle mass and strength
– Metabolic Syndrome (MS) is also prevalent in the aging
METHOD
– Young (22 years) and old (73 years) men with and without Metabolic Syndrome
RESULTS
(1) Atrophy of type II fibers and altered fiber shape characterized muscle aging in lean healthy men
(2) In contrast, increased x-section area of most abundant type I and type IIA fibers, and reduced cytochrome c oxidase content in all fiber types, characterized MS
(3) Aging and particularly MS were associated with accumulation of intramyocellular lipid droplets
(4) Although lipids mostly accumulated in type I fibers, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry imaging of intramyocellular lipids did not distinguish fiber types, but clearly separated young, old, and MS subjects.
CONCLUSION
Our study suggests MS in elderly persons is associated with alterations in skeletal muscle at a fiber-type specific level


EFFECTS OF MUSCULAR STRENGTH ON CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS AND PROGNOSIS – 2013


Enrique G. Artero, and Steven N. Blair et al
SUMMARY
(1) Physical fitness is one of the strongest predictors of individual future health status
(2) Together with cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), muscular strength (MusS) has been increasingly recognized in the pathogenesis and prevention of chronic disease
(3) We review the most recent literature on the effect of MusS in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), with special interest in elucidating its specific benefits beyond those from CRF and body composition.
(4) Muscular Strength MusS has shown an independent protective effect on all-cause and cancer mortality in healthy middle-aged men, as well as in men with hypertension (HTN) and patients with heart failure.
(5) It has also been inversely associated with age-related weight and adiposity gains, risk of HTN, and prevalence and incidence of the metabolic syndrome
(6) Generally, the influence of muscular fitness was weakened but remained protective after considering CRF.
(7) Higher levels of muscular fitness seems to some extent counteract the adverse cardiovascular profile of overweight and obese individuals.
(8) The most important effects of resistance training (RT) are also summarized, to better understand how higher levels of muscular fitness may result in a better cardiovascular prognosis and survival


 

 

 

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