STRENGTH | MUSCLE – WOMEN vs. MEN – AGING


2 RESEARCH ARTICLES


SEX DIFFERENCES IN THE RESPONSE TO RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN OLDER PEOPLE – 2016


AIM
– Acute measurement of protein metabolism data has indicated that the magnitude of response may differ between sexes
– We compared adaptive responses in muscle mass and function to 18 wks resistance exercise training in (>65 years) men and women
RESULTS
– Resistance exercise improved:
1. knee extensor maximal torque
2. 4 m walk time
3. time to complete five chair rises
4. muscle anatomical cross‐sectional area (ACSA)
5. muscle quality with no effect on muscle fat/water ratio or plasma glucose, insulin, triacylglycerol, IL‐6, and TNFα.
– Differences between sexes were observed for knee extensor maximal torque and muscle quality with greater increases observed in men versus women
– Maximal torque increased by 15.8 ± 10.6% in women and 41.7 ± 25.5% in men
– Muscle quality increased by 8.8 ± 17.5% in women and by 33.7 ± 25.6% in men
CONCLUSION
– There is a difference in the magnitude of adaptation, of some of the outcome measures between men and women


ELDERLY MEN & WOMEN BENEFIT EQUALLY FROM RESISTANCE TRAINING – 2013


PURPOSE
– Compare effects of 6 mos resistance-type exercise training
– 3x/wk between healthy elderly women (71±1 yrs) and men (70±1 yrs)
RESULTS
(1) Leg lean mass (3% ± 1%) and quadriceps cross-sectional area (9% ± 1%) increased similarly in both groups
(2) One-repetition maximum leg extension strength increased by 42% ± 3% (women) and 43% ± 3% (men)
(3) Following training, type II muscle fiber size had increased
(4) A type II muscle fiber specific increase in myonuclear and satellite cell content was observed with no differences between genders
(5) Sit-to-stand time decreased similarly in both groups
(6) Glycemic control and blood lipid profiles improved to a similar extent in both women and men


 

 

 

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