HEALTH – OSTEOPOROSIS – NUTRITION


6 RESEARCH ARTICLES + 2 GRAPHICS – CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE


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PROBIOTICS CAN PROTECT THE SKELETONS OF OLDER WOMEN – 2018


University of Gothenburg, Sweden
SUMMARY

– Researchers have demonstrated that probiotics, dietary supplements with health-promoting bacteria, can be used to affect the human skeleton
– Among older women who received probiotics, bone loss was halved compared to women who received only a placebo


MIX OF CURCUMIN AND BIOMEDICAL DEVICES PROMPTS BONE HEALTH AND GROWTH – 2018


Washington State University
SUMMARY
– Researchers improved the bone-growing capabilities on 3D-printed, ceramic bone scaffolds by 30-45 % with curcumin, a compound found in the spice, turmeric


EXPERT CONSENSUS FINDS THAT HIGHER PROTEIN INTAKE BENEFITS ADULT BONE HEALTH – 2018


International Osteoporosis Foundation
SUMMARY
– A new expert consensus has reviewed the benefits and safety of dietary protein for bone health, based on analyses of major research studies
– In seniors with osteoporosis, dietary protein intake above currently recommended levels may help to reduce bone loss and fracture risk, especially at the hip, provided calcium intakes are adequate


SKELETON BONE STRENGTH IS POSITIVELY CORRELATED WITH TOTAL AND DAIRY PROTEIN INTAKES IN HEALTHY POST-MENOPAUSAL WOMEN – 2017


Claire Durosier-Izart and René Rizzoli et al
BACKGROUND & DESIGN
– Bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) are positively correlated with dietary protein intakes, which account for 1–8% of BMC and BMD variances
– 746 Caucasian women aged 65.0 ± 1.4 y
RESULTS
– Mean dietary calcium and protein intakes were greater than recommended amounts for this class of age
– Predicted failure load and stiffness at the distal radius and tibia were positively associated with total, animal, and dairy protein intakes but not with vegetable protein intake


PROTECTIVE ASSOCIATION OF MILK INTAKE ON THE RISK OF HIP FRACTURE – 2014


Sahni S, Hannan MT; J Bone Miner Res.
OBJECTIVE & DESIGN
– To evaluate the association of milk, yogurt, cheese, cream and milk + yogurt intakes with incident hip fracture
– 830 men & women, completed food frequency questionnaires (1988-89) and were followed for hip fracture until 2008
– The mean age at baseline was 77 years (SD:4.9, range: 68-96)
RESULTS
(1) Medium (>1 and <7serv/wk) or higher (≥7serv/wk) milk intake tended to have lower hip fracture risk than those with low
(2) There appeared to be a threshold for milk, with 40% lower risk of hip fracture among those with medium/high milk intake, compared to those with low intake
(3) A similar threshold was observed for milk + yogurt intake
(4) No significant associations were seen for other dairy foods


CAUSAL ASSESSMENT OF DIETARY ACID LOAD AND BONE DISEASE – 2011


Fenton TR, Hanley DA
BACKGROUND
– Modern diets have been suggested to increase systemic acid load and net acid excretion
– Alkaline diets and products are marketed to avoid or counteract this acid, help the body regulate its pH to prevent and cure disease
– The objective was to evaluate causal relationships between dietary acid load and osteoporosis using Hill’s criteria
CONCLUSIONS
– A causal association between dietary acid load and osteoporotic bone disease is not supported by evidence
– there is no evidence that an alkaline diet is protective of bone health


 

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