STRENGTH | MUSCLE – EXERCISE INJURY RISK – AGING


2 RESEARCH ARTICLES


SPRINTERS VS. LONG-DISTANCE RUNNERS – HOW TO GROW OLD HEALTHY – 2014


Kusy, Krzysztof; Zieliński, Jacek
RISKS
Tendinopathy and Rupture
(1) Studies have not revealed a significant relation between either Achilles Tendinopathy and Patellar Tendons and sport specialization in master track-and-field athletes
(2) However, injury rates during competition seem to be significantly higher in sprinters, middle-distance runners, and jumpers
(3) Data indicate rupture risk for the shoulder region and Achilles tendon in master track-and-field athletes after age 45
(4) Significantly increased risk of osteoarthritis of the hip, knee, or ankle in old age is a common adverse effect of competitive sport participation at a young age
Heart Arrhythmias
(1) Years of endurance training is associated with beneficial physiological adaptation of the heart in competitive master athletes
(2) Master endurance athletes have greater heart dimensions (cavities, walls) than aging sprinters and control
(3) Endurance athletes are at much lower risk of chronic diseases of affluence, morbidity, and mortality than the general population
(6) Both sprinters & distance reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and cardiac insufficiency, with endurance athletes being best protected on later stages of life, as it was revealed in a long-term follow-up in former elite athletes


12-MONTH INCIDENCE OF EXERCISE-RELATED INJURIES IN PREVIOUSLY SEDENTARY OLDER ADULTS FOLLOWING AN EXERCISE INTERVENTION – 2013


Robert M D Little1,2Donald H Paterson1,2David A Humphreys2Liza Stathokostas1,2
DESIGN
– Evaluated the 12-month incidence of exercise-related injuries to older adults (63 men, 104 women; mean age 69±5 yr)
RESULTS
(1) 23 people (14%) reported injuries
– 41% were to the lower extremities; the most common type was overuse muscle strains (32%, n=7)
(2) Overexertion was the most common cause of injury (n=9)
(3) Walking accounted for half of the activities during which injury occurred
(4) 70% of injuries required medical treatment
(5) 44% were not able to continue exercising after injury and return-to-activity time varied from 1 to 182 days
(6) Sex, age and exercise volume were not significantly associated with injury occurrence
CONCLUSIONS
– These results showed similar, or lower, exercise-related injury rates as compared with reports on younger and middle-aged adults
– This study indicates that older adults taking up exercise are not at increased risk of injury versus younger age groups


 

Comments are closed.