ENDURANCE – HEAT


3 RESEARCH ARTICLES + 17 GRAPHICS – JULIAN PERIARDASKER JEUKENDRUP |  YANN LeMEURWALSH


ha-factors

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Infographic - 45 Train cool - bathe hot



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3 ARTICLES


SHOULD YOU DRINK WATER OR POUR IT ON YOUR HEAD? – 2016


By Alex Hutchinson
DRINK WATER
– If you drink 250 mL or 8 oz. of water at just above freezing (1 C, 34 F), you’ll get rid of 39 kJ of heat, or about 9 calories
– Calories in this context are a measure of the energy dissipated as heat; the heat is produced as a byproduct of muscular exertion, which is powered by the energy from food
DRINK HALF WATER + HALF ICE
– If you drink a slushie that’s half water, half ice, you’ll get the extra benefit of the energy that’s required to melt the ice inside your body
– A 250-ml slushie will rid you of 81 kJ of heat (19 calories).
POUR THE WATER OVER YOUR HEAD
– Pour 250ml of water on your head
– Ensure that it spreads around your body surface so that it all evaporates rather than dripping to the ground; you will get rid of 607 kJ (145 calories)
– Evaporation is a fantastic way of dissipating heat

– However, if it’s a muggy, humid day where your sweat is already dripping to the ground, you won’t be able to evaporate any more water


COOLING STRATEGIES (BOTH BEFORE & DURING EXERCISE) IMPROVE PERFORMANCE IN THE HEAT – 2014


Bongers CC, et al
METHODS:
(1) 28 studies examined the effects of cooling strategies on exercise performance in men, while exercise was performed in the heat (>30°C)
(3) 20 studies used pre-cooling, while 8 studies used per-cooling.
RESULTS:
– Pre-cooling (+5.7±1.0% and per-cooling (+9.9±1.9%) to improve exercise performance


IMPROVING SOCCER PERFORMANCE IN THE HEAT PRACTICAL PRE-COOLING OPTIONS FOR THE PRACTITIONER – 2012


Paul B. Laursen, New Zealand; ASPETAR – Sports Medicine Journal
KEY POINTS
(1) Exercise performance is lowered in hot conditions, mostly due to higher than normal core temperatures detected by the brain
(2) Reducing core temperature before exercise, termed ‘pre-cooling’, has been shown to be effective at delaying the time before high core temperatures are reached
(3) The most practical means of pre-cooling may be the combination of ingesting ice-slurry, or crushed ice (~500 to 600 ml) combined with the application of cold towels over the extremities, during the 30 to 45 minutes prior to competition


 

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