HEALTH – OSTEOPOROSIS – STRENGTH (RESISTANCE) TRAINING


3 RESEARCH ARTICLES + 1 GRAPHIC – CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE



BONE MINERAL DENSITY INCREASED AFTER 16 WK RESISTANCE TRAINING IN ELDERLY WOMEN WITH DECREASED MUSCLE STRENGTH – 2016


Huovinen V et al
OBJECTIVE
– Non-pharmacological interventions are important in reducing risk for osteoporotic fractures.
– We investigated the effects of a 16-week individualized resistance training intervention on bone mineral density (BMD), bone turnover markers and 10-year relative risk (RR) for osteoporotic fracture.
METHODS
– 37 elderly women (mean age 71.9 ± 3.1 years) with decreased muscle strength participated in the resistance training intervention
– three times per week with 60 min per session for 16 weeks under the supervision of a licensed physiotherapist.
– Total hip BMD with quantitative CT, bone markers (sclerostin, osteocalcin, CTX, PINP, IGF-1, 25(OH)-D) and 10-year RR for osteoporotic fracture were measured at baseline, post-intervention and at 1-year follow-up after the end of the intervention.
– Eleven age- and sex-matched controls did not participate in the intervention but were studied at baseline and at 1-year follow-up.
RESULTS
– Resistance training seemed to increase total hip BMD by 6%
– Sclerostin and total osteocalcin increased while other bone markers remained unchanged.
– A 10-year RR for major osteoporotic and hip fracture remained unchanged.
– At follow-up total hip BMD decreased back to the baseline level with a simultaneous decrease in serum sclerostin, CTX and an increase in 25(OH)-D, 10-year RR for major osteoporotic and hip fracture
CONCLUSIONS
– Our findings suggest an important role of continuous supervised resistance training for the prevention of osteoporotic fractures in elderly women with decreased muscle strength


TOO FIT TO FRACTURE – 2014


L. M. Giangregorio, A. M. Cheung et al
SUMMARY
– A consensus process was conducted to develop exercise recommendations for individuals with osteoporosis or vertebral fractures
A multicomponent exercise program that includes balance and resistance training is recommended


EFFECTS OF RESISTANCE AND AEROBIC EXERCISE ON PHYSICAL FUNCTION AND BONE MINERAL DENSITY – 2011


Elisa A. Marques, et al
PURPOSE
– Compare effects of a resistance training protocol and a moderate-impact aerobic training protocol on bone mineral density (BMD), physical ability, serum osteoprotegerin (OPG), and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) levels

METHODS
71 older women were randomly assigned to:

(1) resistance exercise (RE),
(2) aerobic exercise (AE)
(3) or a control group (CON)

– Both interventions were conducted 3 times per week for 8 months
– Outcome measures included proximal femur BMD, muscle strength, balance, body composition, serum OPG, and RANKL levels
– Potential confounding variables included dietary intake, accelerometer-based physical activity (PA), molecularly defined lactase nonpersistence
RESULTS
– After 8 months,

(1) only RE group exhibited increases in BMD at the trochanter (2.9%) and total hip (1.5%), and improved body composition
(2) Both RE and AE groups improved balance
(3) No significant changes were observed in OPG and RANKL levels, and OPG/RANKL ratio
(4) Lactase nonpersistence was not associated with BMD changes
(5) No group differences were observed in baseline values or change in dietary intakes and daily PA
CONCLUSIONS
Data suggest that 8 months of RE may be more effective than AE for inducing favourable changes in BMD and muscle strength, whilst both interventions demonstrate to protect against the functional balance control that is strongly related to fall risk


 

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