SLEEP – ATHLETE RECOVERY


2 RESEARCH ARTICLES


SSE 113 – SLEEP AND THE ELITE ATHLETE – 2014


– Shona L. Halson, PhD
KEY POINTS
(1) Sleep is essential for athletes, both for preparing for, and recovering from, training and competition
(2) Sleep disturbances in elite athletes can occur both during training and following competition
(3) Sub-maximal, prolonged exercise appears to be more affected by sleep deprivation than short, maximal efforts
(4) Sleep extension and napping can be effective means of enhancing performance in athletes
(5) Athletes should focus on utilizing good sleep hygiene to improve sleep and potentially athletic performance
PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS
– Athletes should focus on utilising good sleep hygiene to maximise sleep. Strategies for good sleep include:
(1) The bedroom should be cool, dark and quiet. Eye masks and earplugs can be useful, especially during travel
(2) Create a good sleep routine by going to bed at the same time and waking up at the same time
(3) Avoid watching television in bed, using the computer in bed and avoid watching the clock
(4) Avoid caffeine approximately 4-5 h prior to sleep (this may vary among individuals)
(5) Do not go to bed after consuming too much fluid as it may result in waking up to use the bathroom
(6) Napping can be useful; however, generally naps should be kept to less than 1hr and not too close to bedtime


EVIDENCE OF DISTURBED SLEEP AND MOOD STATE IN WELL-TRAINED ATHLETES DURING SHORT-TERM INTENSIFIED TRAINING WITH AND WITHOUT HIGH CARB NUTRITIONAL INTERVENTION – 2013


Killer SC1, Svendsen IS1, Jeukendrup AE1,2, Gleeson M1.
METHOD
– 13 highly-trained male cyclists (age: 25 ± 6y, O2max: 72 ± 5 ml/kg/min) participated in two 9-day periods of intensified training while undergoing a high (HCHO) or moderate (CON) carbohydrate nutritional intervention before, during and after training sessions
– Sleep was measured each night via wristwatch actigraphy
– Mood state questionnaires were completed daily
– Performance was assessed with maximal oxygen uptake
RESULTS
(1) Percentage sleep time fell during intensified training (87.9 ± 1.5 to 82.5 ± 2.3%) despite an increase in time in bed (456 ± 50 to 509 ± 48 min)
(2) Sleep efficiency decreased during intensified training 83.1 ± 5.3 to 77.8 ± 8.6%
(3) Actual sleep time was significantly higher in CON than HCHO throughout intensified training
(4) Mood disturbance increased during intensified training and was higher in CON than HCH
(5) Performance in the exercise protocol fell significantly with intensified training


 

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