HEALTH – T2 DIABETES – TOTAL SLEEP & CHRONOTYPE


2 RESEARCH ARTICLES


EVENING CHRONOTYPE ASSOCIATED WITH METABOLIC DISORDERS & BODY COMPOSITION – 2015


Yu JH1, Kim NH et al
CONTEXT:
– Chronotype is a trait determining individual circadian preference in behavioral and biological rhythm relative to external light-dark cycle
OBJECTIVE:
– Examine whether late chronotype is related to metabolic abnormalities and body composition in middle-aged adults, independent of sleep duration and lifestyle
DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS:
– A total of 1620 participants aged 47-59 years were recruited from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:
(1) Chronotype was assessed by the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire
(2) Associations of chronotype with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, sarcopenia, and visceral obesity were analyzed
(3) All participants underwent the oral glucose tolerance test, and body composition was measured with dual energy x-ray absorptiometry
(4) Visceral obesity was designated as visceral fat area, measured by abdominal computed tomography, of >100 cm(2)
RESULTS:
(1) Chronotype was classified as morning in 29.6% of subjects, evening in 5.9%, neither morning nor evening in 64.5%
(2) Evening type was significantly associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome and sarcopenia after adjusting for confounding factors
(3) Gender differences in the associations were evident:
– In men, evening type was associated with diabetes and sarcopenia
– Only metabolic syndrome was associated with evening type in women
CONCLUSIONS:
(1) Evening chronotype was independently associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and sarcopenia
(2) These results support the importance of circadian rhythms in metabolic regulation


SLEEP DURATION & RISK OF T2D – 2015


Shan Z1Liu L5.
RESULTS:
– Ten articles with 11 reports were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis
– A total of 18,443 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained among 482,502 participants with follow-up periods ranging from 2.5 to 16 years
(1) A U-shaped dose-response relationship was observed between sleep duration and risk, with lowest risk observed at a sleep duration category of 7-8 h per day
(2) Compared with 7-h sleep duration per day, the pooled relative risks for type 2 diabetes were 1.09 for each 1-h shorter sleep duration among individuals who slept <7 h per day and 1.14 for each 1-h increment of sleep duration among individuals with longer sleep duration.
CONCLUSIONS:
– Both short and long sleep duration are associated with a significantly increased risk of type 2 diabetes


 

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