CONCURRENT – MORNING WORKOUT PRIMES AFTERNOON PERFORMANCE


2 RESEARCH ARTICLES + 1 GRAPHIC – CLICK ON GRAPHIC TO ENLARGE


COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT MODES OF MORNING PRIMING EXERCISE ON AFTERNOON PERFORMANCE – 2015
Russell M
PURPOSE
– To assess the effects of different modes of morning (AM) exercise on afternoon (PM) performance and salivary hormone responses in professional Rugby Union players
METHODS
–  On 4 occasions 15 professional rugby players provided AM (~08:00h) and PM (~14:00h) saliva samples before PM assessments of countermovement jump height, reaction time and repeated sprint ability.
(1) Control (passive rest)
(2) Weights (bench press: 5 x 10 repetitions, 75% one repetition-maximum, 90 s intra-set recovery)
(3) Cycling (6 x 6 s maximal sprint cycling, 7.5% body mass load, 54 s intra-set recovery)
(4) Running (6 x 40 m maximal sprints, 20 s intra-set recovery)
– 5-6 hours between workouts
RESULTS
(1) PM sprint performance improved after Weights and Running, but not Cycling
(2) PM jump height increased following Cycling and Running, but not Weights
(3) Reaction time remained unchanged between trials
(4) Relative to Control, PM testosterone was greater in Weights and Running, but not Cycling
(5) Salivary cortisol was unaffected by AM exercise
CONCLUSIONS
– All modes of AM exercise improved at least one marker of PM performance but Running appeared the most beneficial to professional Rugby Union players


MORNING BASED STRENGTH TRAINING IMPROVES AFTERNOON PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE IN RUGBY UNION PLAYERS – 2014


Cook CJ1Kilduff LP2Crewther BT3Beaven M4West DJ
OBJECTIVES
– To determine if a morning training session could alter afternoon physical performance
– As testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations are significant predictors of physical performance, and both show circadian declines across the day, we examined the effects of morning training on diurnal (daytime) T and C responses
DESIGN
(1) 18 semi-professional rugby union players
(2) 6 hours between workouts
(3) 0900 hr: players completed a control (rested), Sprint (5 × 40 m) or Weights (3 repetition-maximum [RM] bench press and squat) trial
(4) 15:00 hr: players completed a performance test (3 RM back squat and bench press, 40 m sprint, countermovement jump [CMJ])
RESULTS
(1) Salivary T concentrations declined from am to pm under Control and Sprint, but not under Weights
(2) Delta T, from am to pm, was greater under Control compared to Sprints and Weights
(3) Delta C, from am to pm, was greater under Control compared to both Sprint and Weights
(4) Players elicited better CMJ peak power, 40-m time, 3 RM bench and squat performance under Weights compared with Control and Sprint
(5) Faster 40-m times were seen under Sprint, when compared to Control
CONCLUSIONS
(1) Performing morning strength training is associated with improved physical performance in the afternoon
(2) Additionally, the circadian decline in T concentrations appeared offset by morning training
(3) However, it is unclear if T concentrations are, in part, causal of these improved responses or simply a reflective marker


 

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