TRAINING SCIENCE – RECOVERY


1 RESEARCH ARTICLE + 10 GRAPHICS – CLICK ON GRAPHIC TO ENLARGE


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RAPID RECOVERY VS. LONG TERM ADAPTATION – 2015



INTRODUCTION
– Acute or rapid recovery is different from long term adaptation

– Long term adaptation refers to improvements in the muscle and cardiovascular system resulting in improvements in performance
– What may be good for acute recovery, may not necessarily be good for long term adaptation. Here are a few examples:
1. ANTIOXIDANTS
– They may reduce muscle soreness and help with recovery short term, but high doses have also been linked to reduced training benefits long term
– High doses of antioxidants may interfere with signalling needed to stimulate training adaptation
2. NSAIDS
– Reducing inflammation with NSAIDs such as ibuprofen may help in short term recovery and might help with reducing soreness
– However, it may also impair long term adaptation
3. ICE BATHS
– These may help perception of recovery short term, but may reduce training adaptation long term
CONCLUSIONS
– There are many more examples and in general, removing the signals of stress (which may help short term recovery), will also reduce the signals needed to adapt
– When developing a recovery strategy, keep the main goal in mind: Is it being able to perform again several hours later, or are the main goals further away
– In competitions with several rounds and only a few hours or days between rounds, you would want to optimise all short term recovery strategies
– At the beginning of a season, acute recovery is not always the highest priority and it may be better to choose a strategy that enhances adaptation to training


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