STRENGTH | MUSCLE – LONGEVITY – AGING


6 RESEARCH ARTICLES + 2 GRAPHICS – CLICK ON GRAPHIC TO ENLARGE



SARCOPENIA & POST-HOSPITAL OUTCOMES IN OLDER ADULTS – 2016


Mario Ulises Pérez-Zepeda AldoSgaravatti ElsaDent
RESULTS

– 172 patients (72% female) with a mean age of 85.2 (6.4) years
– Sarcopenia was present in 69 (40.1%) of patients
MORE MUSCLE → REDUCES RISK OF POST-HOSPITAL DEATH
– Patients with sarcopenia were 2x as likely to die in the 12-months post-hospitalisation


ASSOCIATION OF MUSCLE WEAKNESS WITH POST-FRACTURE MORTALITY – 2016


Hanh M Pham Tuan V Nguyen et al
METHOD
– 889 women and 295 men who had at least one low trauma fracture after the age of 50
RESULTS
– Muscle weakness accounted for 15% of premature deaths after fracture in women and 23% in men
MUSCLE STRENGTH → LOWERS RISK OF DYING FOLLOWING A FRACTURE
– Lower muscle strength is an independent risk factor for post-fracture mortality

IS STRENGTH TRAINING (ST) ASSOCIATED WITH MORTALITY BENEFITS? – 2016


Kraschnewski JL; Ciccolo JT et al
METHODS
– Adults age 65 years and older
RESULTS
– 9.6% of NHIS adults age 65 and older reported doing Strength Training
– They had 46% lower odds of all-cause mortality
STRENGTH TRAINING → LONGER LIFE
– ST is significantly associated with decreased overall mortality


MUSCLE MASS INDEX AS A PREDICTOR OF LONGEVITY IN OLDER ADULTS – 2014


PreethiSrikanthanMD, MSaArun S.KarlamanglaMD, PhDb
OBJECTIVE

Is greater muscle mass in older adults associated with lower all-cause mortality?
METHODS
– 3659 participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III
– 55 years or more (65 years if women) at the time of the survey (1988-1994)
– All-cause mortality was analyzed by the year 2004
MORE MUSCLE → LONGER LIFE
– Total mortality was significantly lower in the 4th quartile of muscle mass index


EXERCISE CAPACITY AND MORTALITY IN OLDER MEN – 20 YR FOLLOW-UP – 2010


Peter KokkinosRoss Fletcher et al
STUDIED

– 1986 to 2008; Assessed the association between exercise capacity and all-cause mortality
– 5314 male veterans aged 65 to 92 yrs who completed an exercise test
– Fitness categories were based on peak metabolic equivalents (METs) achieved
HIGHER FITNESS LEVEL → LONGER LIFE
– For each 1-MET increase in exercise capacity, the adjusted hazard for death was 12% lower
– Compared to the least fit (≤4 METs), mortality risk was 38% lower for those at 5.1 to 6.0 METs
– It progressively declined to 61% for those who achieved >9 METs, regardless of age.
– Those who improved had a 35% lower mortality risk compared with those who remained unfit
– Most survival benefits were achieved in those with an exercise capacity >5 METs


ASSOCIATION BETWEEN MUSCULAR STRENGTH AND MORTALITY IN MEN – 2008


Jonatan R Ruiz, Steven N Blair, et al
OBJECTIVE
– To examine prospectively the association between muscular strength and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer in men; 8762 men aged 20-80
CONCLUSION
Muscular strength is inversely and independently associated with death from all causes and cancer in men, even after adjusting for cardiorespiratory fitness and other potential confounders


 

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