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1 RESEARCH ARTICLE


EXERCISE DOSING TO RETAIN RESISTANCE TRAINING ADAPTATIONS – 2011


Bickel CS1, Cross JM, Bamman MM.
INTRODUCTION
– Resistance training (RT) is a proven sarcopenia countermeasure with a high degree of potency
– However, sustainability remains a major issue that could limit the appeal of RT as a therapeutic approach
PURPOSE
– Test two maintenance prescriptions on muscle mass, myofiber size and type distribution, and strength
– We hypothesized maintaining RT-induced adaptations would be greater in the old (60-75 yr) versus young (20-35 yr)
METHODS
– 70 adults in a two-phase exercise trial of Resistance Training 3 days per wk for
PHASE 1
– 16 wks
PHASE 2
– 32-wk period
– 2 Detraining Groups in Phase 2:
(a) reducing the dose to one-third of that during phase 1
(b) reducing the dose to one-ninth of that during phase 1
RESULTS
1. Phase 1 resulted in expected gains in strength, myofiber size, and muscle mass along with IIx-to-IIa shift in myofiber-type distribution
2. Both maintenance prescriptions preserved phase 1 muscle hypertrophy in the young but not the old
3. In fact, the one-third maintenance dose led to additional myofiber hypertrophy in the young
4. In both age groups, detraining reversed the phase 1 IIx-to-IIa myofiber-type shift, whereas a dose response was evident during maintenance training with the one-third dose better maintaining the shift
5. Strength gained during phase 1 was largely retained throughout detraining with only a slight reduction at the final time point
CONCLUSIONS
– Older adults require a higher dose of weekly loading than the young to maintain myofiber hypertrophy attained
– Gains in specific strength among older adults were well preserved and remained at or above levels of the untrained young

Comment: Maintenance programs for Resistance Training in Older Adults must be of shorter duration than those for young adults


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