ENDURANCE-RECOVERY

 



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RAPID RECOVERY VS. LONG TERM ADAPTATION – ASKER


INTRODUCTION
– Acute or rapid recovery is different from long term adaptation

– Long term adaptation refers to improvements in the muscle and cardiovascular system resulting in improvements in performance
– What may be good for acute recovery, may not necessarily be good for long term adaptation. Here are a few examples:
1. ANTIOXIDANTS
– They may reduce muscle soreness and help with recovery short term, but high doses have also been linked to reduced training benefits long term
– High doses of antioxidants may interfere with signalling needed to stimulate training adaptation
2. NSAIDS
– Reducing inflammation with NSAIDs such as ibuprofen may help in short term recovery and might help with reducing soreness
– However, it may also impair long term adaptation
3. ICE BATHS
– These may help perception of recovery short term, but may reduce training adaptation long term
CONCLUSIONS
– There are many more examples and in general, removing the signals of stress (which may help short term recovery), will also reduce the signals needed to adapt
– When developing a recovery strategy, keep the main goal in mind: Is it being able to perform again several hours later, or are the main goals further away
– In competitions with several rounds and only a few hours or days between rounds, you would want to optimise all short term recovery strategies
– At the beginning of a season, acute recovery is not always the highest priority and it may be better to choose a strategy that enhances adaptation to training


SLEEP


SLEEP AND THE ELITE ATHLETE


– Shona L. Halson, PhD
KEY POINTS
Sub-maximal, prolonged exercise appears to be more affected by sleep deprivation than short, maximal efforts
– Sleep extension and napping can be effective means of enhancing performance in athletes
PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS
(1) The bedroom should be cool, dark and quiet. Eye masks and earplugs can be useful, especially during travel
(2) Create a good sleep routine by going to bed at the same time and waking up at the same time
(3) Avoid watching television in bed, using the computer in bed and avoid watching the clock
(4) Avoid caffeine approximately 4-5 h prior to sleep (this may vary among individuals)
(5) Do not go to bed after consuming too much fluid as it may result in waking up to use the bathroom
(6) Napping can be useful; however, generally naps should be kept to less than 1hr and not too close to bedtime


EVIDENCE OF DISTURBED SLEEP AND MOOD STATE IN WELL-TRAINED ATHLETES DURING SHORT-TERM INTENSIFIED TRAINING WITH AND WITHOUT HIGH CARB NUTRITIONAL INTERVENTION


Killer SC1, Svendsen IS1, Jeukendrup AE1,2, Gleeson M1.
METHOD
13 highly-trained male cyclists (age: 25 ± 6y, O2max: 72 ± 5 ml/kg/min) participated in two 9-day periods of intensified training while undergoing a high (HCHO) or moderate (CON) carbohydrate nutritional intervention before, during and after training sessions
RESULTS
(1) Percentage sleep time fell during intensified training (87.9 ± 1.5 to 82.5 ± 2.3%) despite an increase in time in bed (456 ± 50 to 509 ± 48 min)
(2) Sleep efficiency decreased during intensified training 83.1 ± 5.3 to 77.8 ± 8.6%
(3) Actual sleep time was significantly higher in CON than HCHO throughout intensified training
(4) Mood disturbance increased during intensified training and was higher in CON than HCH
(5) Performance in the exercise protocol fell significantly with intensified training


THE ROLE OF A SHORT POST-LUNCH NAP IN IMPROVING COGNITIVE, MOTOR & SPRINT PERFORMANCE IN PARTICIPANTS SLEEP DEPRIVATION


Waterhouse J1, Atkinson G, Edwards B, Reilly T.
METHODS
– 10 males (mean age 23.3 yrs) either napped or sat quietly from 13:00 to 13:30 h after a night of shortened sleep (sleep 23:00-03:00 h only)
– 30 min after the nap alertness, short-term memory, intra-aural temperature, heart rate, choice reaction time, grip strength, and times for 2-m and 20m sprints were recorded
RESULTS
1. The afternoon nap lowered heart rate and intra-aural temperature
2. Alertness, sleepiness, short-term memory, and accuracy at the 8-choice reaction time test were improved by napping, but mean reaction times and grip strength were not affected
3. Sprint times were improved. Mean time for the 20m sprints fell from 1.060 s; mean time for the 20m sprints fell from 3.971 s to 3.878 s


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