ENDURANCE-NUTRITION-PROTEIN & CARBS-MASTERS


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NOTE: 80 kg (176 lbs) x 1.8 grams of protein per day = 144 grams of protein per day


MASTERS 


POST-EXERCISE DIETARY PROTEIN TO MAXIMIZE MUSCLE REPAIR & REMODELING IN MASTERS ENDURANCE ATHLETES


Doering TM1, Reaburn PR, Phillips SM, Jenkins DG.
RECOVERY FROM TRAINING – SLOWER WITH MASTERS ATHLETES
– Recovery practices influence the quality of successive training sessions and, consequently, adaptations to training
– After muscle-damaging endurance exercise, masters athletes experience slower recovery rates in comparison with younger, similarly trained athletes
– Given that these discrepancies in recovery rates are not observed after non-muscle-damaging exercise, it is suggested that masters athletes have impairments of the protein remodeling mechanisms within skeletal muscle
PROTEIN FOR RECOVERY
– The potential benefits of postexercise protein feeding include:
1. Elevating muscle protein synthesis for muscle repair and remodeling
2. Elevating satellite cell activity for muscle repair and remodeling
3. Facilitating muscle glycogen resynthesis
HOW MUCH PROTEIN?
– Despite evidence suggesting physical training can reduce but not eliminate age-related anabolic resistance, masters athletes are currently recommended to consume the same postexercise dietary protein (approx 20 g or 0.25 g/kg/meal) as younger athletes
– Given the slower recovery rates of masters athletes after muscle-damaging exercise, which may be due to impaired muscle remodeling mechanisms, masters athletes may benefit from higher doses of postexercise dietary protein, with particular attention directed to the leucine content of the postexercise bolus
SUMMARY
(1) Following muscle-damaging endurance exercise, masters athletes experience slower recovery rates in comparison to younger similarly-trained athletes
(2) Masters athletes are currently recommended to consume the same post-exercise dietary protein dose (~20 g or 0.25 g/kg/meal) as younger athletes
(3) Given slower recovery rates of masters athletes following muscle-damaging exercise, which may be due to impaired muscle remodeling mechanisms, they may benefit from higher doses of post-exercise dietary protein, with particular attention directed to the leucine content

NOTE: See the protein needs under Strength Training


LOWER INTEGRATED MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN MASTERS TRIATHLETES COMPARED TO YOUNGER ATHLETES


Doering, Thomas M.; Phillips, Stuart M. et al
PURPOSE
– Compare muscle protein synthesis (MPS) rates of masters and younger triathletes over 3 days of intense endurance training
– Recovery of cycling performance, following muscle-damaging running, was also compared between groups.
METHODS
– Five masters age, 53+/-2yr and six younger age, 27+/-2yr trained triathletes
– Participants then completed a 30 min downhill run; 3 x 20 km cycling time trials were completed 10, 24 and 48 h following the run
CONCLUSIONS
– Data shows lower MPS rates in well-trained masters triathletes over 3 days of training
– This likely contributes to poorer muscle protein repair and remodeling
– Acute recovery of cycle time trial performance tended to be poorer in the masters triathletes


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