ENDURANCE-NUTRITION-PROTEIN & CARBS-RUNNING


RUNNING


1


PROTEIN REQUIREMENTS ARE ELEVATED IN ENDURANCE RUNNING ATHLETES AFTER EXERCISE


Hiroyuki Kato, Katsuya Suzuki, Makoto Bannai, Daniel R. Moore
AIM
– Determine average protein requirement and recommended protein intake in endurance athletes during a 3 day controlled training period
DESIGN
– After 2-d of controlled diet (1.4 g protein/kg/d) and training (10 and 5km/d) 6 male endurance-trained adults (28±4 y) did a 20 km treadmill run
– Post run they consumed variable amounts of protein (0.2–2.8 g·kg·d) and sufficient energy
RESULTS
– An estimated average requirement and a recommended protein intake of 1.65 and 1.83 g protein·kg


DISTANCE RUNNERS MAY NEED MORE PROTEIN


By Alex Hutchinson
THE STUDY POSTED ABOVE by KATO, MOORE et al
– 6 distance runners with typical weekly mileage of between 50 and 130 km
– Day 1: 10 km; Day 2: 5 km; Day 3: 20 km time trial
– After the 20K, they consumed an assigned amount of protein (each subject repeated the protocol as many as 7x)
– They needed an average of 1.65 grams/protein/per kilogram body weight/per day to provide amino acids required for muscle repair and synthesis
– This lead to a “recommended” intake of around 1.8 g/kg/day
– That’s higher than the typical 1.2 to 1.4 g/kg/day recommendation for endurance-trained athletes.
ENDURANCE ATHLETES NEED FOR MORE PROTEIN
– Studies suggest about 5% of the energy you burn during exercise comes from oxidizing protein, and that can rise to 10% if muscles are low on glycogen (as they would be late in a 20K). That could account for an additional 0.2 g/kg/day or so in the current study.
– Protein is needed to repair and remodel tissue—not just the muscle you directly damage while running, but also other damaged areas of the body like the gut; In that respect, high-impact activities like running may trigger greater protein needs than lower-impact activities like cycling or swimming


EFFECT OF WHEY PROTEIN HYDROLYSATE ON PERFORMANCE AND RECOVERY OF TOP-CLASS ORIENTEERING RUNNERS


Hansen M, Bangsbo J, Jensen J, Bibby BM, Madsen K.
DESIGN:
– 18 elite orienteers participated in a 1-week training camp (13 exercise sessions)
(1) Half the runners (PRO-CHO) ingested a PRO drink before (0.3 g kg) and PRO-CHO drink after (0.3 g PRO kg and 1 g CHO kg) each exercise session
(2) The others ingested energy and time-matched carbohydrate drinks (CHO)
– A 4-km run-test with 20 control points was performed before and on the last day of the intervention
RESULTS:
(1) PRO-CHO, and not CHO, improved performance in the 4-km run-test
(2) Reduction in sense of performance capacity during the intervention was greater in CHO than PRO-CHO
CONCLUSION:
– Whey PRO before and after exercise improves performance and reduces markers of muscle damage during a strenuous 1-wk training camp


BCAAs REDUCES MUSCLE SORENESS, MUSCLE DAMAGE AND INFLAMMATION DURING AN INTENSIVE RUNNING PROGRAM


Matsumoto K1Koba THamada KSakurai MHiguchi TMiyata H.
– Assess the effects of BCAAs on muscle soreness, muscle damage and inflammation during an intensive training program
– 12 long-distance runners (20+/- 1 yr)
– total distance: males: 86 km, females: 64 km)
– They ate the same meals during the training period
– BCAAs during an intensive training program reduces muscle soreness and fatigue sensation
– The perceived changes could be attributed to the reduction of muscle damage and inflammation


BCAAs REDUCE ACCUMULATION OF BLOOD LACTATE DURING DISTANCE RUNNING


Koba T1Hamada KSakurai MMatsumoto KHayase HImaizumi KTsujimoto HMitsuzono R.
– Investigated the effect BCAA supplementation on tissue damage during distance running
– 8 male distance runners (age: 20.4+/-1.2 years, body weight: 58.4+/-4.2 kg)
– 25-km run
– We measured the blood BCAA and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, an index of tissue damage, pre- and post-run.
– The drinks contained:
(1) BCAA (0.4% BCAA in a 4% carbohydrate solution)
(2) or an iso-calorie placebo drink was provided to the subjects 5x during the run without any restriction in volume
– Maintaining the blood BCAA level throughout a long distance run contributes to a reduction in the LDH release
– Therefore, the effect of BCAA supplementation is suggested to reduce the degree of muscle damage


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