LB-GLUTE MEDIUS/MINIMUS-STRENGTH-MUSCLE-MASS-GRAPHICS


GLUTE MEDIUS/MINIMUS – STRENGTH & MUSCLE MASS


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Weak Glute Medius-Minimus causes Hip Drop and Hip Internal Rotation stressing the Hip Joint, the Lateral Hip & the Knee


ANATOMY


1


FUNCTION


2


TRAINING


3


Age-related muscle atrophy in the lower extremities and daily physical activity in elderly women – 2011 – Ikezoe
– relationship between age-related declines in muscle thickness of lower extremities daily physical activity in elderly women
– 20 young women and 17 elderly women residing in a nursing home
– Daily physical activity was evaluated using life-space assessment (LSA) which assessed degree of independence
– Only the Gluteus Medius was significantly associated with the LSA score


Review of studies evaluating gluteus maximus and gluteus medius activation during rehab exercises .
Michael Reiman – 2011
– S
tudies that evaluated activation of GMax and GMed during rehab exercises; Note: subjects included in this review were healthy
– the following can affect EMG activity: (1) trunk position (2) movement direction (3) base of support
– EMG ranged from 9% to 74% MVIC; strength gains are expected for activation levels = or >40% MVIC
· 74%side bridge to neutral spine position
· 64% – 1-leg squat

· 58% to 52% – (1) 1- Leg RDL (2) pelvic drop (3) side lying hip ab-duction (4) wall squat
· 48% to 40% – (1) transverse lunge (2) 1-leg bridge; forward step-up (3) bird dog (4) lateral step-up (5) clam 30º hip flexion
· 39% to 34%sideways lunge; clam 60º hip flexion; retro backward step-up; 1-leg 1/4 squat; lunge neutral trunk position
· 28% to 27% – bridging on stable surface; prone plank


Which Exercises Target the Gluteal Muscles While Minimizing Activation of the Tensor Fascia Lata? 
– 2013 – Selkowitz et al
– To compare hip abductor muscle activity and to determine which exercises are best for activating the gluteus medius and the superior portion of the gluteus maximus, while minimizing activity of the tensor fascia lata (TFL).
– 20 healthy persons participated. Electromyographic signals were obtained from the gluteus medius, superior gluteus maximus, and TFL muscles using fine-wire electrodes as subjects performed 11 different exercises
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TABLE 1 Normalized Electromyographic Amplitude of Each Muscle for Each Exercise*
Exercise Tensor Fascia Lata Gluteus Medius Superior Gluteus Maximus
Side Lying hip abduction 32.3 ± 13.1 43.5 ± 14.7 (P = .012) 23.7 ± 15.3 (P = .033)
Bilateral bridge 8.2 ± 7.4 15.0 ± 10.5 (P = .011) 17.4 ± 11.9 (P = .008)
Clam 11.4 ± 11.4 26.7 ± 18.0 (P = .006) 43.6 ± 26.1 (P<.001)
Hip Hike 31.4 ± 14.4 37.7 ± 15.1 (P = .196) 17.7 ± 15.2 (P = .001)
Lunge 21.6 ± 14.5 19.3 ± 12.9 (P = .623) 20.1 ± 11.1 (P = .728)
Quadruped hip extension, knee extending 15.6 ± 9.3 27.3 ± 14.9 (P<.002) 28.5 ± 16.6 (P<.007)
Quadruped hip extension, knee flexed 18.7 ± 10.6 30.9 ± 15.2 (P = .001) 30.1 ± 12.5 (P = .012)
Sidestep 13.1 ± 7.1 30.2 ± 15.7 (P = .002) 27.4 ± 16.7 (P = .002)
Squat 4.6 ± 3.8 9.7 ± 7.3 (P = .017) 12.9 ± 7.9 (P<.001)
Step-up 21.4 ± 11.4 29.5 ± 14.9 (P = .065) 22.8 ± 15.6 (P = .754)
Unilateral bridge 18.1 ± 12.9 30.9 ± 20.7 (P = .007) 34.6 ± 16.8 (P = .001)

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